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Tennis Tip: Player Spotlight Eugenie Bouchard


For this month’s tip, instead of reading a how-to, I thought a biography might be a nice change up!
  • Bouchard made history becoming the very first Canadian to reach a Grand Slam final.
  • Twenty-year-old Eugenie Bouchard continued her stellar Grand Slam form, reaching her very first Grand Slam final at Wimbledon.
  • Bouchard is also the only player to reach the semifinals or better at the Australian Open, Roland Garros and Wimbledon in 2014.
  • Following Wimbledon, Bouchard rose to a career-high ranking of World No. 7, the highest a Canadian has ever been ranked.
Quotable Quotes:
"Best friend on tour, I don't have one," Bouchard said. "I don't think the tennis tour is the place to have friends. For me, it's all competition. And I think it's important to just remember that we're going to play against each other. It's not like we're teammates. To me, it's kind of more competitive."

EUGENIE BOUCHARD
SINGLES RANKING: NO 7
CANADIAN
  • Residence: Montréal, Canada
  • Date of Birth: 25 Feb 1994
  • Birthplace: Montréal, Canada
  • Height: 5' 10" (1.78 m)
  • Weight: 134 lbs. (61 kg)
  • Plays: Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
  • Status: Pro
Here’s a bit of background about the rising star. Her early years were a promise of what was to come true. Her childhood drive would suit her and win her the titles she desired.

Courtesy of The Globe and Mail, a Canadian newspaper
SEAN GORDON AND RACHEL BRADY
MONTREAL AND TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jul. 05 2014, 11:32 AM EDT
Last updated Saturday, Jul. 05 2014, 11:33 AM EDT
 
Those who have rubbed elbows with Bouchard longest cite a confluence of factors that explain her meteoric rise, starting with obvious athletic talent. But more so, they stress, since her earliest days in the sport, she has had a relentless and uncompromising devotion to winning Grand Slam titles, and a fearless belief in herself versus any opponent. Despite her eye-catching looks, smiling articulate persona and growing global celebrity, Bouchard is a stone-cold killer on the court.
“Genie had this competitive streak and was never satisfied, always wanted to hit more balls,” said her mother Julie Bouchard in a phone interview with the Globe and Mail last summer. “So it became a growing commitment, two hours a week, three hours a week. By grade 3 she was going every day, in another year, she was starting to leave school a bit early so she could do a private lesson before the group. Then she went to regular school until the middle of grade 7, and then we moved to Florida. It was a long slow process but the interest and fire and competitiveness were always there.”
At nine, Bouchard won a qualifying event in Montreal to get into a 12-and-under tournament in France. The fire intensified then within the youngster.
“I beat 12 year olds to get there, and it really opened my eyes about what I could do,” Bouchard recollected to the Globe during an off-season interview in Florida. “It was the first time I had ever left North America and I was doing it to go play tennis because I earned my way there. In France, I realized I want to travel the world and play tennis as a career.”
The highly-reputed focus extended beyond the court. Michael Cristofaro, the principal of Westmount High School, remembers a driven young woman with outstanding commitment and determination, but who was nevertheless sociable. The school offered a flexible curriculum that allowed her to travel for tennis; she didn’t complete her diploma at the same time as her peers but enrolled in a distance education program, determined to finish.
“She had pretty much the same personality then that she has now,” said Cristofaro.
The same personality carried through, as did the same dream. She admits to looking at her twin sister sometimes to see a very different life from her own.
“We’re very different, but very close, and because she is exactly my age, I see what my life would be like if I wasn’t playing tennis,” said Bouchard, who also has a younger sister and brother. “She’s normal, I’m abnormal – that’s how I see it. It’s cool having someone exactly your own age in your family.”

Maybe her drive stemmed from setting herself apart from her twin sister? The talent and the drive were there.
 
How do your compare? Since no one is keeping track of our stats, Bouchard’s may serve as a “tip” in thinking about goals to shoot for or at least trying to get more 1st serves in, break points won, and returns won to evaluate your own game.

Eugenie Bouchard’s: 
MATCHFACTS
SERVICE RECORD YTD   RETURN RECORD YTD  
ACES 116 1ST SERVE RETURN POINTS WON 39.3%
DOUBLE FAULTS 128 2ND SERVE RETURN POINTS WON 58.5%
1ST SERVE 59.1% BREAK POINTS OPPORTUNITIES 380
1ST SERVE POINTS WON 66.2% BREAK POINTS CONVERTED 49.5%
2ND SERVE POINTS WON 46% RETURN GAMES PLAYED 449
BREAK POINTS FACED 315 RETURN GAMES WON 41.9%
BREAK POINTS SAVED 57.1% RETURN POINTS WON 46.3%
SERVICE GAMES PLAYED 453 TOTAL POINTS WON 52.2%
SERVICE GAMES WON 70.2%    
SERVICE POINTS WON 58.0%    

After the Australian Open upset and going on to beat Venus Williams in 3 sets at the Family Circle Cup in Charleston, S.C., Bouchard played Jelena Jankovic who said of Bouchard: "She's very solid," Jankovic said. "She stays so low and she takes your balls early off the ground, so even though you hit hard, she just picks them up so easily and directs them. That's her biggest strength, that she can absorb someone's ball and just use it.”
 
Also quoted at the Family Circle Cup, Bouchard says: The game is a little bit older, with Serena, and Li Na, for example, doing so well in their 30s, but I'm playing here and now," Bouchard said. "I want to do the best I can right away. There's no point for me to just kind of be relaxed about it. Of course, in each match winning is out of my control, but I want to try to do the best I can as soon as I can, and I want to have 10 successful years and not five slow ones and then five good ones."
 
Bouchard’s rise to the top of the tennis charts and Wimbledon has been quick but not without work and sweat. 
She had to score her two best wins, against World No.7 Angelique Kerber and World No.3 Simona Halep (pictured above).
 
What can we learn from this month's tennis tip?
  1. Attitude and drive to win DO make a difference.
  2. Those who have raw talent rise to the top but not without hard work and dedication.
  3. Don’t let your age define you!
  4. Practice makes perfect!
Hopefully this tip has inspired and educated you and your game of tennis. Eugenie Bouchard’s career has yet to unfold and we are excited to watch.
 
Tune in, the US Open is just around the corner!
 
Get on the Court with Game-Set-Match, Inc.!


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